Amazon’s One-Day Shipping Raises Some Serious Concerns

“Jeff Bezos wants Amazon to be the core infrastructure on which everyone depends, and then use this power to exclude competitors and privilege his own businesses. He doesn’t seek to run a business, but to govern all commerce.”

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It’s hard to imagine that something like one-day shipping on nearly any item could possibly be a bad thing. And yet, there’s no denying that the upcoming level of delivery speed from Amazon actually has some negative aspects, and not just in regards to how much harder its employees will have to work. As Amazon fervently continues to buy stock in different branches of commerce and plant their flag into any avenue of profit that they can manage, it’s become clear that they are well on their way to becoming a monopoly; something the American government is allegedly not too fond of.

One-day delivery isn’t about providing a valuable service to Prime members. Sure, that’s a nice bonus, but as a corporate scheme it really only has one main goal; become the primary infrastructure people depend on. Think about it; customers are impatient. Why buy a product from a seller that will take a week to reach you when you can buy it from Amazon and have it the very next day? By setting themselves up as the most efficient and dependable provider of goods in the commerce sector.

Matthew Stoller of the Open Markets Institute perhaps put it best. “Jeff Bezos wants Amazon to be the core infrastructure on which everyone depends, and then use this power to exclude competitors and privilege his own businesses. He doesn’t seek to run a business, but to govern all commerce.”

This may sound a bit dire, but there’s no denying that Amazon already has the groundwork laid to exert its influence on the majority of the market. Thanks to their relationships with many manufacturers and retailers, Amazon is in the perfect position to ‘encourage’ those companies to use their shipping services as well. It’s the setup to having Amazon be one of the primary providers for retail across the country and the world, even if they aren’t quite there yet.

For some, it might not be obvious why this is a problem. The issue is that Amazon could grow to be so large, powerful, and influential that no one else would feasibly be able to compete with them. No independent company just starting out could even dream of stepping up to their level, which is the root of the problem. Monopolies like that discourage the free market and make it difficult for newcomers or even established companies to compete fairly.

And of course, as touched on previously, it’s taxing for employees of Amazon to work as much as the company wants them to. It takes a lot of physical and mental exertion to facilitate all of this one-day shipping hype. That being the case, it’s understandable why people both inside and outside of Amazon are worried about how much they’re growing, and how much further the plan to go. With their sights set on one-day delivery, we can only guess at what Amazon will move on to once that is accomplished.

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